RE:DESIGN/UXD 2014 Brooklyn New York

RE:DESIGN/UXD 2014 will take place April 28 + 29 in Brooklyn, NY. Like our other RE:DESIGN events, the focus is on salon-style discussions with UX/UI industry leaders and your peers.

The theme for 2014 is BETTER. How do we make products, processes, companies, and our experiences better? Our small-scale discussions will take on the challenge to make things better, while considering what better actually means — is it cultural, contextual, absolute or something else entirely.

Like our Facebook page for updates.

Registration includes two days of sessions, lunch both days, and our evening events. Register now at Eventbrite.

If you’d like to be notified by email about future UX and RE:DESIGN events, send us a note at ux@redesignconference.com

Registration

Registration includes two days of sessions, lunch both days, and our cocktail events. Register now to ensure your spot – we limit the event to 125 attendees and we close to a sellout.

Registration rates:

  • Now to April 27 – $675

Eventbrite - RE:DESIGN/UXD 2014


Schedule

The schedule can be found here. We’re adding speakers to specific time slots as they confirm.


Sponsors

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Our Sponsors

 

Bowling Co-Sponsor and Lunch Day 1 Co-Sponsor:

Coffee Sponsor:

Closing Cocktails Sponsor:

Exhibiting Sponsor:

 

Loft Sponsor and Exhibiting Sponsor:


Our Speakers

 

Christina Wodtke
2014 RE:DESIGN/UXD Symposiarch
[ Show bio ]

Christina Wodtke is currently coaching, consulting, and teaching at California College of the Arts, Stanford and General Assembly. Most recently, she led new product development and reinvention as a GM of Zynga.com at Zynga, was general manager of Social at MySpace, principal product manager at LinkedIn and senior director of design at Yahoo!. Christina also founded a startup where she developed the collaborative blogging tool PublicSquare; founded Boxes and Arrows, an on-line magazine of design; wrote the best selling book “Information Architecture: Blue prints for the Web” and co-founded the Information Architecture Institute.

Justin Bakse
Director of Digital, Brand New School
[ Show bio ]

Pitching Experiences

As Director of Digital, Justin Bakse leads Brand New School’s interactive, experiential, and integrated projects. He works closely with the award-winning live-action and design teams to encourage innovation while creating better engagement for clients and more powerful user experiences for audiences. His inventive approach has produced groundbreaking work for clients such as Citibank, GE, eBay, Kaiser Permanente, Coca-Cola, ESPN, Lenovo and others.

Prior to joining the ranks at Brand New School, Justin was principal of The Studio for Interactive Media. Outside of work, he passes his wisdom on to the next generation of thinkers, teaching classes at the Parsons School of Design.

Pitching Experiences

What’s the difference between a winning pitch and a winning pitch that’s chosen?

Steve Berry
Principal, Thought Merchants
[ Show bio ]

Good Enough is Better

Steve Berry is the principal at Thought Merchants, a UX / UI / Design consultancy based out of New York City. Steve specializes in helping companies of all sizes manage design complexity through a heuristics based approach. In the past, Steve has worked with companies building user interfaces, experiences and brands. He also works with companies as an agile advocate and coach. A selection of previous clients include Harry’s, Riot Games, Monetate, Customer.io, Johannes Leonardo and Bluebox.

Steve is an organizer for GORUCO, the premier Ruby conference in NYC, a co-organizer for the Agile Experience Design Meetup in New York City, founder of Racquet.io, the best way to track and rank casual ping pong at the workplace, and a designer and partner at Code Climate, a hosted static analysis tool to provide automated code reviews.

Description coming…

Abby Covert
Information Architect, Abby the IA
[ Show bio ]

Making. Better. Meaning.

Abby Covert is an independent information architect working and living in New York City. With a proven track record in establishing user-centric practices in a variety of creative environments, Abby also has a reputation for stellar information architecture work in a variety of consulting contexts. Abby prides herself on being an active organizer and mentor within the IA community.

She served as Executive Producer for the IDEA conference in 2010 and the Information Architecture Summit in 2010 and 2012. She currently serves as Co Chair for the 15th annual Summit to be held in March 2014. Abby also serves as an adviser for and holds credit for inventing World Information Architecture Day, which held an inaugural event in 2012 with 14 locations globally serving over 1600 attendees. World IA Day 2014, now in its third year, looks to serve 20+ locations globally.

Abby consults, speaks and writes under the pseudonym Abby the IA, and currently serves as faculty for Parsons, The School of Visual Arts, General Assembly and Hyper Island.

Making. Better. Meaning.

We have all had that moment when someone we are trying to communicate with is misunderstanding what we mean. These moments can be frustrating and lead to upsets of the heart as well as the mind.

When we make physical or digital things, our intended meaning has to project to the user without us being there to show the way or shine the light. For this session, Abby Covert will provoke us about the topic of meaning, daring us to ask ourselves: What do we mean when we say what we say?

 

Sean Dougherty
Creative Director/Director, Brand New School
[ Show bio ]

Pitching Experiences

Sean Dougherty serves as Creative Director and Director, helping guide the visual direction of Brand New School’s digital, design, and live-action projects. His extensive background includes campaigns for Google, Target, McDonald’s, Starwood Hotels, Bloomberg, MTV, and Virgin Media to name a few. Sean’s experience also extends to long form content, having directed a segment of “A Liar’s Autobiography,” the stereoscopic 3D feature film on the life of Monty Python’s Graham Chapman.

As an integral part of the creative team, Sean helps translate Brand New School’s signature style across platforms, providing a seamless user experience. His singular but inclusive sense of humor shines through in his work and is central to Brand New School’s collaborative creative efforts.

Pitching Experiences

What’s the difference between a winning pitch and a winning pitch that’s chosen?

Christopher Fahey
VP of Product and User Experience, Big Spaceship
[ Show bio ]

Design Prioritization: When Better isn’t Obvious

Chris Fahey is the VP of Product and UX at Big Spaceship, and a well-known product and UX design leader, speaker, and teacher. He is responsible for defining and growing Big Spaceship’s product and interaction design expertise, partnering with clients to develop compelling user experiences and useful and innovative products and services.

Previously, Chris led the consumer UX team at ZocDoc, a top NYC startup that empowers patients to book and manage doctor appointments online. Before ZocDoc, Chris was for over a decade a founding partner and Director of UX at Behavior Design, an award-winning New York interaction design consultancy. His clients have included BMW, Chobani, The National Geographic Channel, Cablevision, BusinessWeek, HBO, UNICEF, JPMorgan Chase, and The Onion.

Chris speaks internationally about product design and user experience, and has taught interaction design at the School of Visual Arts MFA in Interaction Design program, and at FIT and Brooklyn College.

Design Prioritization: When Better isn’t Obvious

Jeff Gothelf
Principal, Neo Innovation
[ Show bio ]

There Is No Such Thing As Mistakes: Surprising Insights From Jazz Improvisation

Jeff Gothelf is a designer & Agile practitioner. He is a leading voice on the topics of Agile UX & Lean UX and a highly sought-after speaker, workshop leader and teacher. In addition, Jeff is the author of the O’Reilly book, Lean UX: Applying lean principles to improve user experience (www.leanuxbook.com). Jeff has led teams at TheLadders, Publicis Modem, WebTrends, Fidelity, & AOL. Currently Jeff helps drive Neo’s lean and agile training and education offerings out of their NYC office.

There Is No Such Thing As Mistakes: Surprising Insights From Jazz Improvisation

Great team collaboration is the secret sauce of successful companies. At its core, collaboration comes from the culture of your company and the dynamics of your team. In this entertaining presentation, Jeff (on piano) and Jim (on bass) will perform a couple of jazz/blues tunes (yes! we will be playing live music!) to illustrate collaboration tactics key to the success of great bands. Through our performance and explicit callouts we will illustrate:

  • - the importance of an iterative form for the way your team works
  • - the power of listening to your colleagues
  • - how knowing your role on the team provides a high level of individual freedom while pushing the team forward
  • - the benefit of immediate feedback
  • - how great collaborators never make mistakes

Join us for this fun musical adventure!

Bryan Hamilton
VP, User Experience, Razorfish
[ Show bio ]

Better Companies

Bryan is a geek with a fine arts degree, born in Trinidad & Tobago and raised in Toronto. He has held roles as creative director, interactive producer, interaction designer and information architect. Besides his family, his great love is to connect technology and content to people’s lives in helpful and unexpected ways. He contributed to the customer experience of brands like UNIQLO, Mercedes-Benz, Ford, Billboard, The Hollywood Reporter and HBO.

Bryan is currently Vice President, User Experience at Razorfish and leads a group of about 50 UX professionals for the New York and Atlanta offices.

Better Companies

Successful companies make a difference by being better. Over the last 100 years we have seen this happen across spectrums of quality, price and experience as a means to prove they are better than their competitors. Today we are seeing a new breed of companies that pick established customer experiences, imagine a simpler way, and build a business around delivering it. These are new ideas that form new types of companies rather than just new products. Lets explore some of these revolutionary experiences across banking, transportation, shopping and hypothesize what we currently experience that is ripe for a new type of company.

 

Vincent Higgins
Executive Director, UX, DDB California
[ Show bio ]

Age Of The Alchemist: A D&D Approach to UX Design

Vincent Higgins is the Executive Director of User Experience (UX) for DDB California, leading client engagements from the user experience strategy and interaction design perspective.

Vincent started his career at Y&R, and then transitioned into the (dot)com world. At 26 years old, he founded Bluefuse, a design boutique in SoHo, NYC that created and developed digital products. Corporate clients included, Nokia, CBS and MTV, as well as agencies such as Grey and JWT, among others. As agencies digitally matured, Vincent returned to help drive strategic platform development and marketing as it relates to customer experience and acquisition.

Vincent combines the skills of a business savvy digital entrepreneur with the passion and enthusiasm of an inspirational storyteller. Vincent keeps everyone focused on one thing: people. Whether it is advertising, an app, or a business solution, Vincent’s experience in user design puts people in the center of the strategy.

A Drupalist, recovering World of Warcraft addict, and a Certified Usability Analyst (CUA), Vincent is a family man who loves the game of hockey.

Age Of The Alchemist: A D&D Approach to UX Design

Today, brands need, and want to place the consumer at the center of all marketing activity. However, maintaining consistency and ensuring the greatest brand expression possible means getting specialists from multiple disciplines, and agencies on the same page. This integration is easy in theory, but incredibly challenging in practice.

The solution: Age of the Alchemist, a Dungeon Masters approach to designing brand experiences. At the intersection of brand communication and UX design lies “Communications Alchemy” a methodology of transforming forgettable experiences into meaningful ones using agility, charisma and wisdom. While “Communications Alchemy” might be new to Advertising & Marketing, it is old news to fans of RPG such as Dungeons & Dragons. By taking cues from this immersive game and leveraging dynamic technologies of today, we can foster better consumer connections by delivering personalized, tangible, and rewarding experiences.

For more information please visit: http://vimeo.com/70815786.

Erin Hoffman
Lead Game Designer, GlassLab
[ Show bio ]

Sophia: Designing for Learning through Emotion

Author and video game designer Erin Hoffman was born in San Diego and now lives in northern California, where she works as Game Design Lead at the Institute of Play’s GlassLab, a Bill and Melinda Gates and Macarthur Foundation supported three-year initiative to innovate big-data-powered video games for learning. Prior to joining GlassLab, Erin developed games for Konami, Dreamworks, Zynga, D3P, and more. She is the author of the Chaos Knight series from Pyr books, beginning with Sword of Fire and Sea, followed by Lance of Earth and Sky and concluding with Shield of Sea and Space in 2013. For more information, visit www.erinhoffman.com and twitter @gryphoness

Sophia: Designing for Learning through Emotion

Description coming…

Randy Hunt
Creative Director, Etsy
[ Show bio ]

Data-Informed Design

Randy Hunt is Creative Director at Etsy, where he leads a team of designers creating the end-to-end experience, both online and off. Hunt feels strongly that designers must be able to build what they design, a perspective that fits naturally with Etsy’s culture of making and the love of craftsmanship. Hunt co-founded Supermarket, a curated design marketplace. Previously, he founded Citizen Scholar Inc. and worked at Milton Glaser Inc. and Number 17. He writes and lectures about design and has been a visiting designer and critic at many colleges and universities. His first book, Product Design for the Web will be published in November.

Data-Informed Design

Description coming…

Steve Johnson
VP, User Experience, LinkedIn
[ Show bio ]

Conversation with Steve Johnson

Coming soon…

Conversation with Steve Johnson

 

Jim Kalbach
Principal UX Designer, Citrix Online
[ Show bio ]

There Is No Such Thing As Mistakes: Surprising Insights From Jazz Improvisation

Jim Kalbach is a Principal UX Designer with Citrix Online. He holds a degree in library and information science from Rutgers University, as well as a Master’s degree in music theory and composition.

Jim is an active speaker, writer, and instructor on user experience, usability, and information architecture. He is the author of the book Designing Web Navigation (O’Reilly, August 2007) and blogs at experiencinginformation.com.

Playing jazz bass is a primary creative outlet for Jim. In Hamburg, Germany – where he lived for the last 15 years – he led a local jazz quintet, composing and arranging most of their songs. Now back in his native New Jersey, Jim participates in various local jam sessions.

@jimkalbach

There Is No Such Thing As Mistakes: Surprising Insights From Jazz Improvisation

Great team collaboration is the secret sauce of successful companies. At its core, collaboration comes from the culture of your company and the dynamics of your team. In this entertaining presentation, Jeff (on piano) and Jim (on bass) will perform a couple of jazz/blues tunes (yes! we will be playing live music!) to illustrate collaboration tactics key to the success of great bands. Through our performance and explicit callouts we will illustrate:

  • - the importance of an iterative form for the way your team works
  • - the power of listening to your colleagues
  • - how knowing your role on the team provides a high level of individual freedom while pushing the team forward
  • - the benefit of immediate feedback
  • - how great collaborators never make mistakes

Join us for this fun musical adventure!

Peter Koechley
Co-founder, Upworthy
[ Show bio ]

Peter has been making important ideas irresistible for more than a decade — as an Onion editor, a viral video producer, and now, as a co-founder of Upworthy.

At 24, he became managing editor of The Onion, where he co-created the company’s break-out Onion News Network video series, staffed and oversaw digital strategy, and wrote YOUR all-time-favorite Onion headline.

Peter joined MoveOn.org in 2007 to work on video strategy and youth vote initiatives. During the 2008 presidential campaign, he led a team that helped raise $10 million dollars, and added 2 million members to the organization.

In early 2012, Peter co-founded Upworthy with longtime collaborator Eli Pariser. The pair set out to prove once and for all that what’s important can be incredibly popular, even if what’s popular isn’t usually important. To date, the Upworthy community has logged more than 1.5 billion minutes of attention on topics ranging from the criminal justice system to advertising’s adverse effects on body image to clean energy.

A Madison, Wisconsin native, Peter is based in Brooklyn, where he lives with his wife, toddler son, and dog. You should follow him on Twitter here.

Donna Lichaw
Principal, Greatnorthelectric
[ Show bio ]

Take My Job

Donna Lichaw is a product management and user experience strategy consultant, advisor, speaker, and educator. She specializes in mobile, tablet, responsive web, and mobile first product strategy – in other words, getting the best results by helping teams think big by starting small. Donna has worked with a variety of businesses around the world, from startups to nonprofits to established Fortune 500 companies, such as Seamless, Citi, Bloomberg, Parsons The New School for Design, Apartment Therapy, WNYC, Atlantic Records, General Assembly and Nerve.com.

Take My Job

Only designers are qualified to craft amazing user experiences, right? We spend years learning, doing, and honing our craft as a reaction to non-designers designing digital things that were difficult to use. But you know what a lot of product managers with little to no design training are now responsible for? The user experience. They do things like talk to users, whip up wireframes and mockups, build interfaces and flows, and determine feature sets and functionality. You know what developers, founders, even executives never stopped doing and don’t think twice about doing? Designing stuff. After years of working as a designer, manager, and developer, Donna finally learned the secret to designing great digital products and user experiences: teach everyone *else* on the team how to do it right and do it well. Join Donna as she shows you how to inject some pedagogy into your work life so that you can effect change, improve quality, and better create awesome things with a team. See how outsourcing and open-sourcing your job not only fosters an environment of creativity, but renders the designer and design team invaluable and indispensable.

Meredith Noble
Director of Interaction Design, Catalyst Group
[ Show bio ]

How to Better Handle the Stress of UX Work

Meredith is a UX generalist who is passionate about community building, educating the next generation of UXers, and tea. She is currently exploring places where the personal meets the professional, from mentorship, to leadership and coaching, to handling stress at work.

How to Better Handle the Stress of UX Work

Working as a UX designer can be incredibly stressful. Our work is constantly subject to intense scrutiny and debate from clients and colleagues. If we’re consultants, we have the added pressure of constantly proving our worth to clients. Even the fast pace and ill-defined nature of the field itself can lead to stress: we can suffer from impostor syndrome and general insecurity about where we fit in our own profession.

I’ve suffered from all of the above, and I suspect many others have as well. I’ll discuss the design process, identify common stressful situations and thoughts, and present concrete techniques for coping with that stress.

 

Charlene McBride
Sr. Experience Designer
[ Show bio ]

Better Living Through Sensors and Devices

Charlene McBride is a Sr. Experience Designer and has worked on brands large and small with several agencies over the past fourteen years including SapientNitro, Digitas and Razorfish. Previously she spent a decade working in children’s television and animation.

Charlene grew up in the Midwest at the caramel center of urban and suburban life and where she learned that the cure for boredom is curiosity. She is co-author of Sketchnotes: A Field Guide for the Busy Yet Inspired Professional and spends her spare time painting and bookbinding in her loft in Lowell, MA. She tweets way too much as @ursonate.

Better Living Through Sensors and Devices

In 2013 I began an exploration of how my home could be transformed by employing a selection of sensors, devices and services that detect presence, monitor and change conditions and report back.

In this session,

we’ll explore how these services impact living and we’ll discuss how we can use the potential of the things in our homes to design better lives.

Chris Pallé
Founder, Wisdom & Craft, Inc.
[ Show bio ]

Better For-Profits

With over 17 years of strategic, creative, and analytical User Experience-related practice, Chris is an engaging and influential workshop leader whose ideation techniques are proven to uncover innovative solutions to his clients’ toughest customer experience problems.

Chris believes that for-profit companies should be for the profit of many. And, the unique opportunity that we have as leaders is to ensure the the products and services we create are designed to make a difference for the greater good.

Chris has served in numerous institutions such as world-class ad agencies, e-commerce enterprises, and education groups ranging from small boutique shops to Fortune 100 companies.

Better For-Profits

Description coming.

Andre Plaut
UXDi Education Product Manager, General Assemb.ly
[ Show bio ]

The Design of Learning

Over the last six years, Andre Plaut has been designing and delivering learning experiences for Apple Inc., Obama for America, and General Assembly. As a training coordinator at Apple, Andre designed and delivered internal training materials to retail employees all over the world. During the 2012 Obama campaign, Andre worked with campaign staff to redesign, organize, and implement training initiatives and materials to better prepare new volunteers for the field. Now, at General Assembly, his focus is on designing and implementing the User Experience Design Immersive course on a global scale.

The Design of Learning

Description coming.

Anders Ramsay
www.andersramsay.com
[ Show bio ]

How Understanding What Developers Do Can Make You A Better UX Designer

Anders Ramsay is a veteran UX designer, independent consultant, and member of the Rosenfeld Media experts group, specializing in helping organizations apply Agile and Lean methods to UX practice. His past clients include McGraw-Hill, Lonely Planet, PitneyBowes, Sony Pictures, Viacom, and the City of New York. Anders is also highly active in the UX Community, including leading the NYC IA Meetup the Agile Experience Design Meetup, the Agile Experience Design social network, and blogging about all things UX at andersramsay.com.

How Understanding What Developers Do Can Make You A Better UX Designer

For most non-technical team members on a project team, what developers do tends to be a black box. You hand them some wireframes or sketches or whatever and then they go off and do… something. Maybe you have a general idea of what’s involved in building software, but unless you actually are a developer, that’s usually about it.

In this session, we’ll explore what it actually means to write code, how you don’t need to be a “coder” to understand what developers do, and how understanding what it means to code can empower you as a UX designer to be more effective at integrating your work into the actual product implementation. We’ll take a non-developer view of techniques commonly associated with coding, such as pair programming, refractoring, test-driven development and continuous integration, and show how understanding them can offer riches in terms of improved collaboration, and healthier and more effective working relationship between designer and developers.

 

Ajay Revels
Design Researcher, Politemachines
[ Show bio ]

Do Better: Designing for Transformation

Ajay Revels is a strategic design researcher with 14 years expertise in planning and leading fieldwork to uncover business & customer insights and to translate those insights into actionable, multi-channel digital strategies and on-screen designs that connect handheld devices, kiosks, web and service touch points into holistic experiences.

She has carried out design & customer studies within settings as diverse as hedge funds, universities, hospitals, trading floors, consumer trade shows, news rooms and private homes in the US, Britain and Japan. The genuine curiosity, humor and empathy she brings to each interaction allows her to work easily with a wide range of study participants; from high school students, hedge fund traders to heart surgeons. To integrate customer insights into the product design process, she collaborates with designers, product owners, developers, data analysts, market researchers and other stakeholders.

Ajay’s toolkit includes in-person observations, interviews, workflow analysis, process mapping, sketching, games, online panels, experience modeling, participatory design, iterative LeanUX/Agile experiments and design validation. As a consultant for Razorfish, HUGE, Adaptive Path and Flow Interactive, she has developed user insights for CNN, Boston Scientific, Merrill Lynch, MTV, Lionsgate Films, Center for Foreign Relations and TD Ameritrade.

Educated in biological systems, anthropology and product design she integrates systems thinking, design thinking, change management and ethnographic techniques to uncover and visualize how people create, connect to and consume information to meet their business, social and decision-making needs.

She has presented at EPIC (Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference) and SXSW, taught a Lean UX workshop for NPower and published articles for the Society for the Anthropology of Work and Japan Inc. Ajay is a member of BayCHI and the Society for the Anthropology of Work.

Her other research interests include serious games, play, comics as a strategic planning tool, science literacy, insect natural histories and ecosystem-centric design.

Do Better: Designing for Transformation

Objects could be better if they were designed for transformation instead of for obsolescence. User-centered design is too narrow and too focused only on human beings. We need ecosystem-centric mental models, methods and design tools. Here’s why: from one point of view the Earth is seen as an inert resource to be used until depleted. This is a parasitic perspective in which energy & materials flow in one direction, toward the extractor and away from the source. Another view is the symbiotic orientation which assumes that the energy & materials we use to create new products flow in multiple directions, are useful to several user types, and will transform over time before returning to a fundamental organic state again. This applies to many products like clothing, furniture, vehicles, construction materials, food containers, digital hardware among others. What would we need to do in order to begin designing for transformation instead of obsolescence?

Tim Riley
Director of Online Experience, Warby Parker
[ Show bio ]

How to Better Understand Your Users

Tim Riley is the Director of Online Experience for Warby Parker, where he works to make the process of buying eyeglasses online as fun and easy as possible. Prior to Warby Parker, Tim developed strategies for enhancing the customer experience for clients such as Volkswagen, Audi, Walgreens and Kaplan University. He’s also done some other interesting stuff but he prefers to leave his bio short.

How to Better Understand Your Users

Knowing who you are designing for and what problem you are trying to solve for them can make or break an experience. We’ll explore all of the ways you can become educated on the needs of your end users—with a bigger focus on testing ideas with users earlier in the process and refining solutions over time.

Luis Daniel Rodriguez
UX Designer, Queen and Clarendon, LLC
[ Show bio ]

Smart World Stories Are The New Design Stories

Luis grew up in Ecuador, South America but now lives in the Washington, DC Metropolitan area. He combines his background in graphic design with training in screenwriting to complement his web development and interaction design skills.

Smart World Stories Are The New Design Stories

How do we link Human Experiences to systems of engagement, (IA Architectures, Data APIs)? Supporting “curating, ripping and sharing” between humans and machines? And support a world where humans cannot escape the consequences of their actions? and how do we design for tomorrow’s “creative native generation” that creates what they want (3D printing)?

In this session Designer Luis Rodriguez will share ways to see beyond today’s design stories made up of context, system, usability and visual design components. Lead your cross-functional team to go beyond building desirable and usable to connected and purposeful products and services by fitting them into digital and physical ecosystems that put emphasis in connectivity and purposeful design.

Lou Rosenfeld
Founder, Rosenfeld Media
[ Show bio ]

Designing a Better You

Lou Rosenfeld is founder of Rosenfeld Media, a leading source of user experience books, training, and consulting. He is an author of the best-selling Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (O’Reilly; 3rd edition 2006) and Search Analytics for Your Site (Rosenfeld Media, 2011), co-founder of the annual Information Architecture Summit and the Information Architecture Institute, and a former columnist for Internet World, CIO, and Web Review magazines. As a consultant, he’s helped AT&T, Ford, PayPal, Caterpillar, and many other large, highly-political organizations grapple with their information headaches.

Designing a Better You

What do you want to do?

It’s a deceptively hard question to answer. But your past–your personal story–can help suggest your future direction.

We’ll work together to tell your story and create a mission statement for you, one that emphasizes what you can, should, and want to do.

 

Nick Whitmoyer
Senior Consultant, Whitmoyer
[ Show bio ]

Designing a Better Process for UX

Nick Whitmoyer is the founder and principal of Whitmoyer, a user experience and design agency based in Falls Church, Virginia. For more than 10 years, Nick and his team have helped clients such as NPR, Capital One, PBS, Global Entrepreneurship Week, and The Nature Conservancy build award-winning microsites, interactive tools, apps, and more. He is the force behind his company’s mission to collaborate with the best and brightest companies in the U.S. and abroad on innovative, user-centered interactive design projects.

Designing a Better Process for UX

Whether you’re working in-house or in client services, there are a number of great processes and methodologies at your disposal. In this session we’ll discuss ways to customize a better process for UX teams.

 


The Conference Location

The conference will be held at the Wythe Hotel in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, one train stop from Manhattan. This amazing space, housed in a former factory on the Williamsburg waterfront, is the perfect setting for RE:DESIGN’s unique small-scale discussions.


Who Will Be Attending

Attending companies include Pixar, Viacom, Deloitte, IDEO, Autodesk, Tory Burch, 72andSunny, 50onRed, PayPal, Zillow, Gogo, WebMD, RSA, SapientNitro, ESPN, RSA, New York Magazine, Cisco and many others.

wythe hotel room

Hotel Options

Info regarding hotel options will be sent upon registration.


Learn about the last 2013 event in Menlo Park

Learn about the 2012 event in San Francisco